When We Judge a Book By Its Cover


Hey, young bloods! The awesome Áine came up with a stupendous idea a while ago, based on the idea of judging a book by its cover. Basically, you get a collection of book covers and show them to someone who's never read the books before, then compare what they think the book is about based on its cover to what the book is actually about! (If that made any sense lmao. I'm crap at explaining things.) So for this epic mission I enlisted the help of my friend Reagan. Without further ado, I hope you enjoy!


Reagan's Synopsis

"Maybe some pirates. But it also looks kind of modern so maybe some city kids get involved in some kind of old pirate mystery. Or get kidnapped by pirates."

Actual Synpopsis

In one devastating night, violin prodigy Etta Spencer loses everything she knows and loves. Thrust into an unfamiliar world by a stranger with a dangerous agenda, Etta is certain of only one thing: she has traveled not just miles but years from home. And she’s inherited a legacy she knows nothing about from a family whose existence she’s never heard of. Until now.

Nicholas Carter is content with his life at sea, free from the Ironwoods—a powerful family in the colonies—and the servitude he’s known at their hands. But with the arrival of an unusual passenger on his ship comes the insistent pull of the past that he can’t escape and the family that won’t let him go so easily. Now the Ironwoods are searching for a stolen object of untold value, one they believe only Etta, Nicholas’ passenger, can find. In order to protect her, he must ensure she brings it back to them—whether she wants to or not.

Together, Etta and Nicholas embark on a perilous journey across centuries and continents, piecing together clues left behind by the traveler who will do anything to keep the object out of the Ironwoods’ grasp. But as they get closer to the truth of their search, and the deadly game the Ironwoods are playing, treacherous forces threaten to separate Etta not only from Nicholas but from her path home... forever.


Reagan's Synopsis

"Maybe some rich kid back in the 1900s finds a garden full of children statues? And maybe they were real children that got turned into statues or something? And there's an evil parent or tutor involved."

Actual Synopsis

Who is Dominique? When Nina first sees her in the French Museum, she senses that there is something unreal about the strange, beautiful girl. In fact, Domi is from Napolean's time, and she has come to get Nina's help. For Domi's father was executed as a traitor during the French Revolution, and Domi is convinced that Nina can prove his innocence. But to save Domi's father, Nina will have to solve a mystery that has lasted two centuries. And she will have to travel back through time, back to France and the court of the stone children...



Reagan's Synopsis

"It kind of looks like some kid is robbing a magical bank. Maybe it's a portal he's walking through? So a random delinquent kid discovers a magical world while robbing a bank."

Actual Synopsis

“Tell no one what I’ve given you.”

Until he got that cryptic warning, Christopher Rowe was happy, learning how to solve complex codes and puzzles and creating powerful medicines, potions, and weapons as an apprentice to Master Benedict Blackthorn—with maybe an explosion or two along the way.

But when a mysterious cult begins to prey on London’s apothecaries, the trail of murders grows closer and closer to Blackthorn’s shop. With time running out, Christopher must use every skill he’s learned to discover the key to a terrible secret with the power to tear the world apart.

Okay side note this is one of my very favorite Discworld books; if you like clocks and magic and snarky MCs I DEFINITELY recommend this one.

Reagan's Synopsis

"Some evil guy puts a spell on time, and then he either reverses or freezes it? That seems like the stuff evil people tend to do with time."

Actual Synopsis

Everybody wants more time, which is why on Discworld only the experts can manage it -- the venerable Monks of History who store it and pump it from where it's wasted, like underwater (how much time does a codfish really need?), to places like cities, where busy denizens lament, "Oh where does the time go?"
While everyone always talks about slowing down, one young horologist is about to do the unthinkable. He's going to stop. Well, stop time that is, by building the world's first truly accurate clock. Which means esteemed History Monk Lu-Tze and his apprentice Lobsang Ludd have to put on some speed to stop the timepiece before it starts. For if the Perfect Clock starts ticking, Time -- as we know it -- will end. And then the trouble will really begin...


Reagan's Synopsis

"Ooh this looks cool. Okay, let's see. Evil magic person is wreaking havoc or doing something evil to the city (those things that look like maps at the bottom) and some other magic being comes into the city to stop them from killing everyone?"

Actual Synopsis


Kell is one of the last Antari, a rare magician who can travel between parallel worlds: hopping from Grey London — dirty, boring, lacking magic, and ruled by mad King George — to Red London — where life and magic are revered, and the Maresh Dynasty presides over a flourishing empire — to White London — ruled by whoever has murdered their way to the throne, where people fight to control magic, and the magic fights back — and back, but never Black London, because traveling to Black London is forbidden and no one speaks of it now.

Officially, Kell is the personal ambassador and adopted Prince of Red London, carrying the monthly correspondences between the royals of each London. Unofficially, Kell smuggles for those willing to pay for even a glimpse of a world they’ll never see, and it is this dangerous hobby that sets him up for accidental treason. Fleeing into Grey London, Kell runs afoul of Delilah Bard, a cut-purse with lofty aspirations. She robs him, saves him from a dangerous enemy, then forces him to take her with him for her proper adventure.

But perilous magic is afoot, and treachery lurks at every turn. To save both his London and the others, Kell and Lila will first need to stay alive — a feat trickier than they hoped.

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Thank you again to Reagan for helping me out with this! So, let's chat - Do you judge a book by its cover? If there are any books here you haven't read yet, what did YOU think of it based on its cover? Comment below, and have an awesome day. <3

Namarië,
Ellie

15 comments:

  1. Woww I love the cover for Passengers.

    I admit it, I judge books by their covers! If it has a cover I find attractive, I'm much more likely to pick it up - and if I put it back down, then I'm also more likely to keep thinking about it and go back to it (this happened with the Nightfall Chronicles by Karpov Kinrade; beautiful cover that kept me coming back and *almost* buying it. Couldn't get into the present tense writing, though). However, I don't let the cover be my only deciding factor. If I did, then I never would have given my current favorite series a chance!

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    1. I KNOW RIGHT? It could almost be a picture writing prompt.
      dUDE SAME. Yeah, the Wheel of Time and Lost Years of Merlin covers suck, but the series are pretty good. On the flip side, the Paper Towns cover is absolutely gorgeous, but the book is just mediocre.

      - Ellie

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  2. Ah, I loved this post, Ellie! I watched polandbananasbooks on youtube do this a while back w/ her family and it was hilarious. I want to do it with one of my parents sometime. I feel like it'd be just as amusing. xD
    I usually always judge a book by its cover. Something in my brain likes to argue that an awesome cover usually relates to good content, even though I //know// that's not always true. Like Eve said above, though, I don't always do it, and one my favorite series has the most awkward, romance-style covers that don't even begin to do the actual books justice.
    xx a

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    1. Thanks!
      Me too! Is that the Heirs of Chrior?

      - Ellie

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    2. Nah, Heirs of Chrior has pretty neat covers. The Lux series are the ones that make me cringe, even though the series is like my second all time favorite. xD
      xx a

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  3. I'll admit it: I do judge a book by it cover. Sort of. If I see a book with an awesome cover, I'm going to be interested in it. A bad cover can put me off a book, if I've never read it.

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  4. Reagan's synopsis for The Blackthorn Key made me laugh. I haven't read it, but I really like the whole "a random delinquent kid discovers a magical world while robbing a bank."

    And I still need to read A Darker Shade of Magic! It's kind of sad that I haven't yet, actually, considering how pretty much everyone thinks it's the most awesomest thing ever.

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    1. I would read that book, tbh.
      I haven't read it either! I guess whenever a book is really popular, I automatically have an aversion to reading it - I don't want to be too "mainstream", and I'm always afraid it'll fall below the hype even if it's a good story.

      - Ellie

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  5. I always judge books by their covers, and they always surprise me. The Blackthorn Key looks cool.

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  6. This is such a cool idea! I'm so guilty of judging books by their covers, but so often the covers actually have nothing to do with the book ♥
    Amy xx

    Little Moon Dragon

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    1. Áine's a genius, ik xD
      THAT'S SO TRUE THOUGH.

      - Ellie

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