Meet My Newest Character: The Language of Worlds #2

by - 10:31 AM


Hello, friends! And welcome to another edition of "Ellie is a narcissist who loves talking about her own writing and will not stop, ever."

Liv @ Liv K. Fisher recently created a character-based linkup for writers of speculative Christian fiction and other genres. I just started a new WIP that returns to the universe of some of my oldest characters--but I've also been adding in some new ones. Among them is the latest character I've created, and although I've only been bopping around in his head for a few weeks now, I already know he's one of my all-time favorites. So what better character to introduce to y'all this month? 

Without further ado, I present to you Jack Hatch--the enigmatic owner of Jack Hatch's House of Wonders, a magic shop. 

ft. a small reordering of some questions for expository purposes because it is, after all, my blog


First, a quick bullet list of background facts about him:

  • His name is Jack Hatch. It is not Jack, and it certainly isn't Hatch. It is Jack Hatch. He doesn't answer to anything else.
  • He's sly, flamboyant, clever, and has a voice like tennis shoes dragging down a gravel road.
  • Is his merchandise real or counterfeit? Public opinion is split. Is he the least ambitious wizard the world has ever known, or is he the city's best con man? You decide.

1. In five words or less, how would you describe your character? 


2. When do they see an opportunity for self-improvement? When his magic fails or a business strategy doesn't work out quite as he'd hoped.

3. How do they view themselves (good, neutral, evil, etc.)? Jack Hatch thinks he's good when it matters, but he also doesn't think it frequently matters. He doesn't think a lot of things are evil that other people think are evil (like befriending ghosts or smuggling), so he doesn't have much moral dilemma in a lot of situations. But when he does have a moral dilemma, he'll always pick what he views as the morally correct option. He's a strong believer in the concept of karma as well as in ritual and tradition, or the Right Way to do things.

4. Is there a story that inspires them? What is it? Oh, yes. This gets a little long, so buckle up.

Once upon a time there was a poor little girl named Ella. Except she had the very uncreative nickname Cinderella because she was always covered in cinders, and she wasn’t even assertive enough to explain to the historians that Cinder was not a part of her given name, and so her name went down as Cinderella forevermore. But that is neither here nor there. The important bit is why she was always covered in cinders, and that is because she lived with a very mean stepfamily who made her do all the housework. But she was nice about it because she was a good person or whatever.

But one day, an invitation came from the castle. The family was invited to go to a royal ball. And Cinderella was nice about asking to go because she was a good person or whatever, but her stepfamily was not, so they all said no. And then they tore up the dress she had been planning to wear and left her in the courtyard crying when they went off to the ball. 

But then a fairy godmother, who for some reason known only to Charles Perrault decided now was when she was needed most, as opposed to when Cinderella had been getting physically and emotionally abused over the past several years, showed up. And she waved her wand and sang a catchy tune and gave Cinderella a beautiful gown and carriage, with which she went to the ball and wooed the prince. She was also really nice to him because she was a good person or whatever, and that probably helped, too.

And then when Cinderella was queen, all the maidens in the kingdom wanted to wear gowns just like hers. Naturally, she gave them her fairy godmother’s phone number, and they all called wanting dresses and coaches and love potions and a thousand other magic things. So the fairy godmother set up a booming business selling magic items to the young ladies of the kingdom at exorbitant prices, and she became Fairyland’s first millionaire, and she retired at the young age of 203 into a magnificent villa on the Italian coast and never had to work another day in her immortal life.

Moral of the story, as Jack Hatch sees it: Be the fairy godmother.

5. What proverb or quote do they identify with?

"Respond to every call that excites your spirit." -- Rumi
"Only those who risk going too far find out how far they can go." -- T.S. Eliot
"I'd rather die on an adventure than live standing still." -- V.E. Schwab
"I saw that my life was a vast glowing empty page, and I could do anything I wanted." -- Jack Kerouac
"She wore a smile like a loaded gun." -- Atticus 

6. What does their standard day look like? After waking up, he has a small breakfast of scrambled eggs, toast, and tea. The tea smells like fish guts and tastes like nothing at all, and Jack Hatch creates the blend himself from some of the herbs that grow out of his bottomless trunk. After getting dressed + ready for the day, he does everything he has to do to open the shop. He makes sure no red potions are sitting next to any blue ones. He chains down any spellbooks that got particularly rowdy during the night. He might even make a restock run, like to the Undead dentist down the street to refill his supply of vampire teeth. When the store is open, he works behind the counter, selling and stocking and everything else; he is the only employee. At night, he shuts down the shop and plays a few rounds of cards before going to bed. There used to be a ghost who would come by and play poker with him; Jack Hatch called the ghost Boo, and the ghost called himself Jack Hatch. But the ghost has not been around for a while, so Jack Hatch generally goes to bed alone.

8. Do they have a favorite memory? If so, what happened? He loved his time in the courts of the Lord and Lady Witches of Sen Faradel. The country where Jack lives, Mes Tuiriel, doesn't have a lot of magic about it. It is commonly known that Sen Faradel is the breeding ground for most of the world's magic, a place where warlocks run wild, every stream is somehow enchanted, and even the blades of grass seem to be sentient. (In fact, Jack smuggles in most of his merchandise from Sen Faradel.) The Lord and Lady Witches are important figures in the Sen Faradelian magic scene, so his travels there and stays in their courts to learn some of the ways of magic are very important to him. Many of his most prized possessions are souvenirs from that trip.

7. What they picture their ideal day, how does it go? It would probably be spent in Sen Faradel exploring the ways of magic. He might be out by the sandstone cliffs listening to them tell him about the waves or sitting in a swamp witch's shack helping her sort chalks and potions, but whatever it is, he'd be learning by doing. 

9. Where do they see themselves in five years? He really enjoys his work with his store, so he hopes to be presiding over an expansion. He also sees himself becoming much more proficient with magic.

10. What is their life dream? He's not 100% sure. He loves both the business and magic sides of what he does, so he'd like to both expand his business dramatically and retire into Sen Faradel.

Some Jack Hatch sorts of songs (this isn't part of the linkup; I'm just extra): "Something to Believe In" by Young the Giant | "Friends on the Other Side" from The Princess and the Frog | "Chasing the Sun" by The Wanted | "High Hopes" by Panic! at the Disco | "In the Heights - Radio Edit" from In the Heights | "Thumbs" by Sabrina Carpenter

PSST! -- If you liked Jack Hatch and want to read about another antihero from his story, an undercover assassin, you can click right here to see my last Language of Worlds post. :)

Thank you again to Liv for creating + hosting this linkup! Talk to me, friends: What do you think of Jack Hatch? Who are your newest characters? How's your writing going? It's been a while since I posted about creative writing, so I want to hear about the progress on ALL your WIPs. 

Namàrië,
Eleanor

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13 Comments

  1. Jack Hatch sounds like a lot of fun! He reminds me a bit of Nate Philbrick's Denna Dorwen (she's a side character in his novel, but he's written a short story centered around her: https://natephilbrick.com/the-astoundingly-mortal-peril-of-denna-dorwen). I'd love to read more about Jack Hatch. :)

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    1. Thank you! I hadn't heard of that story, but it looks wonderful. I'll have to try and get my hands on it.

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    2. OKAY I JUST BOUGHT AND BINGED THE ENTIRE PHOENIX ANTIHERO ANTHOLOGY IN ONE SITTING AND IT WAS ABSOLUTELY WONDERFUL AND BLEW ME AWAY. Denna Dorwen was probably my favorite story, of course (though I loved all of them!!--and Wolf at the Door was a close second.)

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  2. Oh. My. Gosh. I think I'm in love with this guy. This is incredible.

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  3. This dude sounds amazing. The sly confident chaos though, I LOVE IT. (Not so keen about the undead dentists...but then aren't all dentists probably undead?!? So maybe you have a point...)

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  4. I adore this Jack Hatch, and I need a story like this!
    It sounds amazing!

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  5. This character sounds amazinggg I seriously need a story like this in my life!! x

    Grace Louise || www.gracelouiseofficial.blogspot.co.uk/

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  6. I really want to know more about this! Augh, this Jack Hatch seems like my kind of character XD

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